Doug Lane Part 2: Creating the “Money Shot” Staging Presidential Events

Doug Lane Part 2: Creating the “Money Shot” Staging Presidential Events

“IT IS FASCINATING HOW MANY PEOPLE THINK YOU CAN WORK FOR 18 STRAIGHT HOURS. IT’S AMAZING.” — DOUG LANE on taking care of yourself on the road.

This week, we continue our conversation with Doug Lane, founder of FastLane Productions. He has spent more than 30 years planning and staging presidential caliber events for political campaigns and the private sector.

Doug shares more of his fascinating perspectives gained by working on behalf of presidents, presidential campaigns and VIP sports and entertainment figures.

I have worked with Doug and Fastalane numerous times, and I can attest he is among the very best of the best in this small, highly specialized field.

In this episode, Doug explains why money isn’t always the top consideration when staging the most ambitious events; how teamwork makes all the difference when working on a tight deadline; and the single most overlooked thing when dealing with your production team…

Wayne Laugesen PART 2: How to Ace a Newspaper Endorsement Interview

Wayne Laugesen PART 2: How to Ace a Newspaper Endorsement Interview

In this episode, we speak with Wayne Laugesen, Editor of the Editorial Pages at the Colorado Springs Gazette.

In Part 2, Wayne gives candidates, causes, and issue advocacy groups unprecedented insight into how the Editorial Board Interview process works. He lays out just how the Ed Board prepares for the interview and how the interviewee should prepare. Wayne provides invaluable advice on how to conduct yourself during the interview. He goes on to explain how editorial boards make their decision on which way they are going to endorse and then how they actually go about writing the endorsement editorial.

Josh Kraushaar: A National Reporter’s Perspective on How Politicians Could Better Work w/ the Media

Josh Kraushaar: A National Reporter’s Perspective on How Politicians Could Better Work w/ the Media

In this episode, we speak with Josh Kraushaar, Political Editor at National Journal where he also writes a popular bi-weekly column “Against the Grain,” that takes a contrarian view to the typical Washington cliches and conventional wisdom.

Josh takes us behind the scenes and on the beat of a political reporter. We reverse engineer what it takes to be a good communications director or press secretary by getting Josh to give a national political reporter’s perspective on how campaigns and politicians could better handle the media and get their message out to voters.

Wayne Laugesen PART 1: Inside Look at Newspaper Editorial Pages

Wayne Laugesen PART 1: Inside Look at Newspaper Editorial Pages

In this episode, we speak with Wayne Laugesen, Editor of the Editorial Pages at the Colorado Springs Gazette. In this series, Wayne pulls back the curtain and reveals the inner workings of Newspapers and Editorial pages.

In Part 1, Wayne explains how editorial pages work and their day to day operations. We discuss how newspapers have stayed relevant in the new media age. We also learn lessons from Wayne’s long career as a journalist, including his role in developing “Commando Journalism”

MVP: How Pro-Football Quarterback Jack Kemp Changed America

MVP: How Pro-Football Quarterback Jack Kemp Changed America

In this episode, we speak with Mort Kondracke, the co-author of Jack Kemp: The Bleeding-Heart Conservative Who Changed America. This is the first and only definitive biography of Jack Kemp, the legendary Buffalo Bills quarterback, dynamic Congressional leader, and champion of supply-side economics — the idea that lowering taxes spurs economic growth.

Mort Kondracke and his co-author Fred Barnes, the editor of The Weekly Standard, make the argument that Jack Kemp is the most influential non-president, American politician of the last century.

Rule of 7: Returns on Repetition

Rule of 7: Returns on Repetition

One key to effective campaigning is repetition. Far too many campaigns think that if they have knocked on someone’s door once, called a voter a couple times, run one radio or newspaper ad and sent a mail piece they have done enough to win. As I’ve said before, what does it take to win an election? More than you think. My belief that repetition is important isn’t just my belief, it’s a proven fact. When it comes to getting people to act or change their habits, I look to the professionals. For ages, the marketing and business world has had the “Rule of Seven.” The Rule of Seven states that it typically takes at least seven touches or impressions to make a sale. And data bares that out. In fact, over 80% of sales are made after seven points of contact with a customer. Clearly, the example I mentioned at the beginning of this article doesn’t meet the threshold of the Rule of Seven and also doesn’t account for the fact that competition exists, too. The Rule of Seven is focused on the business world where your business may be focused on a customer that another business isn’t as interested in. In politics and campaigns, the target universe is defined and competition for voters’ attention is fierce. You need to make an impression. If you live in the Eastern US, it’s quite possible that you’ve made the family pilgrimage to Florida along Interstate 95. I did the obligatory family road trip with my family about 25 years ago. As you head south through North Carolina, you see billboard after...